The OaF was originally inspired by the Ambient Orb, a nice little pager network driven indicator which gave the promise of telling you how things are going. It seems to me that it’s most successful application was in the power industry where companies issued them to consumers to help guide their power conservation efforts.

When I saw this in the early 2000s I had a different take on it. My thought was that I wanted one indicator that just said “everything is ok” maybe with a few other states like “your process is running,” “warning,” or “error.”  This required two features first a hierarchy of aggregated statuses so warnings could be overlapped and managed in terms of importance and second powerful networking support which I got from twisted.
Implementation wise OaF has support for inputs from web forms, xmlrpc, email monitoring, and http ping. Outputs include the original Ambient Orb, the system tray, Second Life objects, Arduino on the serial port, and a web page. At this point I’m releasing as is and will work on making sure all this works on the next pass.

  1. Grab the code from SVN and post it into GitHub:  DONE https://github.com/Ciemaar/oaf
  2. Write up an introductory blog post:  DONE, this post here.
  3. Make the code work:  IN PROGRESS, as posted it sort of works.
  4. Attach the code to Codacy to run analysis:  DELAYED, Codacy is asking for rights to all my repositories and I can’t give them.
  5. Build a deployment package of some sort:  IN PROGRESS, setup.py is included, but not fully tested.
  6. Put up another post here with more details and an open source license:  NOT STARTED

Long Delayed Releases

December 21, 2016

I’ve decided that it’s time, well past time to get a bunch of my old releases so, over the next few weeks I’m going to be going through some of my old code and just getting it out there.  I’m also going to be grabbing my old projects–even the unfinished and bad ideas–from SVN and dumping them into GitHub.  Here’s the process I plan to follow:

  1. Grab the code from SVN and post it into GitHub.  I’m not going to keep any history here, just check to make sure I’ve got the passwords out.  Moving passwords to config files is going to be the main part of my work.  At this point I won’t apply a proper open source license, but I’ll be glad to take requests if anyone sees a use for the code right away.
  2. Write up an introductory blog post here explaining what the code is supposed to be doing and why.
  3. Make the code work, in many cases this is very old code so it’ll have to account for new versions of twisted, Python, and webservices.
  4. Attach the code to Codacy to run analysis.
  5. Build a deployment package of some sort, probably pushing code to pypi and/or dockerhub.
  6. Put up another post here with more details and an open source license.

So, the next few posts on this blog should follow in this line–at least as much as I can over an otherwise plenty busy holiday.